Buddhist Monk

January 29, 2013

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Stone

January 27, 2013

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“Travel far enough, you meet yourself.”
― David Mitchell

Zen Buddhist Priest

January 27, 2013

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“This thing called parting
Has no color
Yet it seeps into our hearts
And stains them with loneliness.”  –Ki-no-Tsurayuki

Lines of a Temple Roof

January 24, 2013

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“…we’re constantly waking up to what we’re about, what we’re really doing in our lives. And the fact is, that’s painful. But there’s no possibility of freedom without this pain.”
― Charlotte Joko Beck

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“When you break something, is your first impulse to throw it away? Or do you repair it but feel a sadness because it is no longer “perfect”? Whatever the case, you might want to consider the way the Japanese treated the items used in their tea ceremony. Even though they were made from the simplest materials… these teacups and bowls were revered for their plain lines and spiritual qualities. There were treated with the utmost care, integrity and respect.
For this reason, a cup from the tea ceremony was almost never broken. When an accident did occur and a cup was broken, there were certain instances in which the cup was repaired with gold.
Rather than trying to restore it in a what they would cover the gace that it ahad been broken, the cracks were celebrated in a bold and spirited way. The thin paths of shining gold completely encircled the ceramic cup, announcing to the world that the cup was broken and repaired and vulnerable to change.
And in this way, its value was even further enhanced.”
― Gary Thorp